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2017 SOLAR ECLIPSE

About the August 21st Eclipse

On August 21, 2017, the total solar eclipse happens when the moon moves right in front of the sun, covering it completely for a very short time. It darkens the whole sky and allows you to look right at the sun through the use special solar viewing glasses.

 

Please DO NOT LOOK AT THE ECLIPSE DIRECTLY there are still harmful UV light rays that could damage your retina, use proper glasses. The only time it is safe to look at the eclipse without special glasses on is the minute or so that the Eclipse is in full totality, this means being in Lincoln City, Salem or Madras, if you are in Portland or anywhere else, you should never take your glasses off. For those with the 1m58 seconds worth of totality, you can take your glasses off and you will see the beautiful corona that surrounds the sun. Even some of the brighter Stars and Planets will now be seen by the naked eye out and the horizon will glow with a 360-degree sunset. The temperature even drops as day turns into night.  

 Proper advance planning and promotion will help communities in the eclipse path be prepared for the biggest astronomical event of the century.
 
On the beach in Oregon, just north of Newport, the shadow first touches land at about 10:15 in the morning, and will experience a full minute and fifty seconds of totality.  The actual centerline of the eclipse path hits solid ground a full six seconds later, and plunges Lincoln Beach and Depoe Bay into darkness for 1m58s!!


 It takes only about two minutes for the shadow to race eastward toward its first date with a large population of folks who will be breathlessly awaiting its arrival.

 Dallas, Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Philomath, McMinnville, Woodburn, and yes, Salem itself, experience various lengths of totality (based on their varying distances from the centerline); on the steps of the State Capitol in Salem (the first of five state capitals the shadow will visit), lucky viewers will be treated to 1m54.5s of shadow at just after 10:17am..
 
The eclipse travels through the forests of central Oregon, hitting the mountains at Madras and Warm Springs at about 10:19. Mitchell and Prairie City are next, and the shadow leaves Oregon just north of Ontario.

 Actually, Ontario gets 1m23s of totality at 11:25am MDT, but folks there would be better served to head north to the rest area north of Huntington on I-84, or into Idaho on US 95 between Midvale and Weiser, for better than 30 seconds more totality!!

 The Majority of the Pacific Northwest IS NOT in the path of totality, but will still witness a partial eclipse ranging from 99% to 88%.

 The Solar Eclipse Viewing Party will include science lectures, astronomy-related community groups, entertainment. And at OMSI’s request, ARRG is setting up and manning a complete Amateur Radio station and providing a live reporting network via Amateur Radio for this year’s event. The live reporting will come over the loudspeakers and carries up to the minute reports from various Amateur Radio teams stationed across the Eclipse path.

 


Want to get involved with the Science of a Total Solar Eclipse?

 

Check out the HAM SCI Website and learn more about becoming a scientific monitoring station.

 

2017 Eclipse Experiment Description

HamSCI is inviting amateur radio operators to participate in a large-scale experiment which will characterize the ionospheric response to the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse and target these open questions in ionospheric physics.

 

Introduction

On 21 August 2017, a total solar eclipse will cause the shadow of the moon to traverse the United States from Oregon to South Carolina in just over 90 minutes.

This will be the one of most significant solar eclipses traversing the continental United States for the next 100 years. While solar eclipses are perhaps best known for their stunning visual display, the shadow of an eclipse also cause strange changes to the ionosphere which effects radio wave propagation, and this effect is useful for the study of ionospheric physics.

Although the ionospheric effects of solar eclipses have been studied for over 50 years, many unanswered questions remain.

Some include, “How much of the ionosphere is affected by the solar eclipse, and for how long?

Why is this the case?”

Experiment Summary

Here are some other Scientific Questions that the project hopes to answer:

·        How much of the ionosphere is affected by a solar eclipse?

·        For how long is the ionosphere affected by a solar eclipse?

·        What causes these spatial and temporal scales?

Methodology

·        Illuminate the ionosphere with an Eclipse QSO Party.

·        Use networks such as the Reverse Beacon Network to collect data.

·        Use amateur radio data to complement data from other sources.

To get involved as a HAMSCI observer, please visit http://www.hamsci.org/node/122

 

More about what you will see

 Proper advance planning and promotion will help communities in the eclipse path be prepared for the biggest astronomical event of the century.
 
On the beach in Oregon, just north of Newport, the shadow first touches land at about 10:15 in the morning, and will experience a full minute and fifty seconds of totality. 

The actual centerline of the eclipse path hits solid ground a full six seconds later, and plunges Lincoln Beach and Depoe Bay into darkness for 1m58s!


 It takes only about two minutes for the shadow to race eastward toward its first date with a large population of folks who will be breathlessly awaiting its arrival.

Dallas, Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Philomath, McMinnville, Woodburn, and yes, Salem itself, will experience various lengths of totality (based on their varying distances from the centerline); on the steps of the State Capitol in Salem (the first of five state capitals the shadow will visit), lucky viewers will be treated to 1m54.5s of shadow at just after 10:17am.
 
The eclipse travels through the forests of central Oregon, hitting the mountains at Madras and Warm Springs at about 10:19. Mitchell and Prairie City are next, and the shadow leaves Oregon just north of Ontario.

 Actually, Ontario gets 1m23s of totality at 11:25am MDT, but folks there would be better served to head north to the rest area north of Huntington on I-84, or into Idaho on US 95 between Midvale and Weiser, for better than 30 seconds more totality!

 The Majority of the Pacific Northwest IS NOT in the path of totality, but will still witness a partial eclipse ranging from 99% to 88%.

 The OMSI/NASA Solar Eclipse Viewing Party at the Salem Fairgrounds will include science lectures, astronomy-related community groups, entertainment.

 And at OMSI’s request, ARRG is setting up and manning a complete Amateur Radio station and providing a live reporting network via Amateur Radio for this year’s event. The live reporting will come over the loudspeakers and will carry up to the minute reports from various Amateur Radio teams stationed across the Eclipse path.

 On August 21, 2017, the total solar eclipse happens when the moon moves right in front of the sun, covering it completely for a very short time. It darkens the whole sky and allows you to look right at the sun through the use of special solar viewing glasses.

 Before and after Totality, when the Sun is in a partial or complete eclipse, do not look at the event without some sort of approved Eclipse Viewing glasses, as there are still harmful UV light rays that could damage your retina.  

 Some of the brighter Stars will come out during totality, and participants might see Mars, Mercury and Venus. You might be able to see Regulus, which is a bright star that normally the sun’s light blocks out from view.

 Take a quick look around the area, because the horizon will glow with a 360-degree sunset and even the temperature drops and day turns into night.

  If you have any questions, please contact me at w7pm@live.com

 73,

Marc Peterson, W7PM

www.arrg.org

 

ECLIPSE INFORMATION NET

On Monday, August 21st, 2017, the Total Solar Eclipse Viewing Party, which is sponsored by OMSI, will be held at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Oregon. Dozens of exhibits and Seminars begin at 6 a.m. and go through 12 noon.

NASA TV, and many Local and National TV Networks will be on hand to report and record the entire OMSI event at Salem this year.

The ARRG and OCRG Eclipse Information Net frequencies

Update 08/18/17 : Due to technical problems or outright failure, the repeaters highlighted in RED will not be linked during the Informal OR Formal Eclipse Net period...hang out and use only those in black, until further notice. -W7PM

Oregon Coast to Salem   440.900 + 118.8Hz   Mt. Hebo   OCRG                                                    444.750 + 118.8Hz   Newport   OCRG Portland Metro West             444.400 + 100.0Hz   Chehalem          K7RPT/ARRG                       147.320 + 100.0Hz   So. Saddle

                                          442.325 + 100.0Hz   Failed; after decades of 24/7 use, the 442.325 repeater on South Saddle (one which is used as a Hub to Portland 147.040 and Astoria 146.720) failed.

Astoria North Coast, SW Wa. 146.720 -  114.8Hz   Wickiup Mtn.     

Salem to Mt. Hood                 147.120 + 100.0Hz   Mt. Hood           K7RPT/ARRG                           444.225 + 100.0Hz   Mt. Hood          

Mt. Hood to Redmond           147.040 + 114.8Hz   Redmond           K7RPT/ARRG

Madras and Prineville           442.225 + 114.8Hz   Wide Area       K7RPT/ARRG

Participating in the Eclipse Information Net

Date:               08.12.2017

To:                   All Eclipse Information Net Operators, Repeater Owners and Participating Net Control OPS

From:              Marc Peterson, W7PM, with ARRG and the K7RPT Repeater System

RE:                  Now Expanded -Oregon Solar Eclipse Help & Information Amateur Radio Net 

During the Week of the Eclipse, the Oregon Eclipse Help & Info Net will be active for up to five days surrounding the August 21st Eclipse date. Beginning on Thursday evening, August 17th, 2017, much of the K7RPT and W7GC repeaters will be combined to form a seamless communication ‘super’ channel.

This Net will use Eleven of Oregon’s best wide-area repeaters, all of which will be linked together to become one of the State’s only seamless Amateur Radio Communications platform that will specifically provide coverage along the Eclipse path. The Eleven Repeaters will be linked by long haul Radio Links and  will not rely on any landline, cell or the internet connection, which can fail under heavy use that will be caused when the Million + visitors descend on Oregon next week.

The repeaters and temporary site links are being built and provided by the Amateur Radio Relay Group (ARRG) and the Oregon Coast Repeater Group (OCRG).  You can learn more about the Eclipse Information Net and download the latest updated version of this guide by visiting www.arrg.org/events.htm 

 

Important Notice to all Visitor’s - Oregon has a very tough Distracted Driving Law 

Please do not touch or operate a cellphone or other device while driving or even stopped at a stop light. You can use Hands Free devices using steering wheel buttons, just be careful not to have it up against your face or touch it if it’s on your cradle. 

After a terribly long fight with Legislators, Ham’s finally were exempted from the law, but you have to carry a copy of your Amateur Radio License and present it as a defense if you get pulled over during your visit to Oregon.

There are more parts to the new Law, so check out this well written story:

 http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2017/06/29/legislature-clarifies-hands-free-only-legal-way-drive-oregon/440982001/

 

Guidelines to follow while using the system during 4-day Informal and the Formal 1-day Net

 

1-     The Solar Eclipse Observation Formal Net period will take place on the morning of the Eclipse event, August 21, 2017 and starts around 6 a.m. and will go through 12 Noon. The Eclipse Net Control Operators, as well as other Helpers will be taking Observation reports from the dozen or so Official Eclipse Observation Amateur Radio Stations which will be operational along the path of ‘totality.’ The Formal Net is a Directed Net, so please do your best to go through Net Control to make any call or contact.

2-     During the Formal Net period, our NC will be taking check-ins and reports from our Official Eclipse Observer/Reporting teams, which are in operation along the Eclipse path.

3-     Reports of celestial objects or planet or star sightings will be reported to Net Control and passed along to the ARRG Team embedded with OMSI and NASA at the Salem Fairgrounds.

4-     During the Informal Net period, where we will have Net Control and Helper stations listening on a stand-by basis so they may assist any station in need. This part of the Net will be more informal in nature and not a ‘directed net’. All Amateur Radio Operators are encouraged to participate by keeping the Net updated by providing traffic and incident reports with observations that will help others navigate the area.  Amateurs will be allowed to directly make calls and contact other stations without needing to go through a Net Control.

5-     Hams who use the system to make contact with other Hams may do so freely as long as they are not interfering with other informal Net Operations. Hams may call and connect with other Hams and may engage in short QSO’s, but please keep all QSO’s short and under 5 minutes in length.

6-     Hams who make contact with another Ham, should consider moving off to another frequency so as to keep the entire system free for emergency traffic.

7-     All Users are asked to add a 3 second pause between each transmission to allow others to break in and put a call out for assistance, which any NC, Helper or participating station may respond to accordingly.

8-     Lastly, during Informal or Formal Net periods, we may be asked to pass emergency traffic and messages to communities which might be cut off because of total failure of the landline/cellular/internet systems due to overloading caused by the million + unsuspecting visitors.

9-     The Repeaters used for this net have been requested months in advance and will be used for the Net as described. Unless we receive a special request from an official OEM, ARES or CERT lead or an authorized Public Safety Agency, the eleven linked repeaters will be used as planned.

10- However, when officially requested, the entire Net and our 11 repeaters may be turned over to the OEM, ARES or CERT teams as they provide special emergency assistance during this event.

11- Any official request to use (or take over our system) needs to be approved by Marc Peterson, W7PM at w7pm@live.com or via Cell at 503-935-9799

During the Informal 4-day Net period, our NC/Monitor Helpers will be providing assistance to motorists who are travelling to and from their Eclipse viewing location. We are there to help Amateur Radio operators who will be visiting Oregon for the Solar Eclipse or just travelling through the area during Eclipse week.  

The net will give travelers the ability to ask any active Net Control or Monitors for assistance with directions, traffic conditions or pass health and welfare messages as may be required. With the possibility of the entire landline/cell system becoming overloaded, the Oregon Emergency Management or ARES might request to activate their own emergency net and may need to use the linked system to pass emergency messages and other welfare traffic. 

Informal Net Operations 

Beginning on Thursday Night, August 17th, 2017, the 11 repeaters will be networked together into one super group. The repeaters will remain linked up until Tuesday, August 22, 2017, or later, if the situation dictates it should stay in operation. 

During the informal net period, Hams may use the system as normal, but please keep all conversations as short as possible and under 5 minutes in length. Please leave long pauses between transmissions to allow emergency breaks. 

The system will be carrying the regularly scheduled nightly ARES D1 Net at 7:30 p.m. and the Cascade Council Scout Net on Sunday at 4:30 p.m. The CARES Group meets on Sunday Night at 7:00 p.m.

The system will also carry any normally carried nets which utilize the OCRG repeaters. 

Formal Net Operations 

On the morning of the actual Eclipse, Monday, August 21st, 2017, the formal ARRG/OTVARC Official Eclipse Observation net will be held. The Net will be led by Pat Roberson, W7PAT, who will be set up at one of the ARRG Official Observation Stations in Salem. The net will start sometime after 6 a.m. and last until 12:00 p.m. (or later if the situation dictates).

 Participating in the formal Net 

The Net will be held live on the K7RPT and OCRG repeater system. Any station along the Eclipse Path may check in on the net with observation reports. Please be advised that the Local and National media (including NASA TV) are covering the event live and we have been forewarned that some of our Net traffic as carried over our PA system, will be carried live or recorded for later use. 

NASA TV and many TV Networks will be carrying the event live to millions around the world and luckily for the ARRG team, we were invited to be embedded with the OMSI team, close to all the action and within a couple hundred feet of the NASA booth.  

We’ve been asked to provide our frequency list to the broadcast pool, so there is a decent chance that NASA TV or a TV Broadcaster will be listening to the Formal Net. Please be professional and keep your transmissions and reports short and to the point. 

Regular Hams can participate too! 

Any station along the Eclipse Path may check into the formal Solar Eclipse Net to report partial or full totality reports, other observations about noise decrease or increase on any of your test bands (HF or VHF/UHF).   

Please report sightings of any bright stars or other celestial objects that might appear during the Eclipse, stating which direction you are looking and at about what elevation the object is. The ground or horizon would be 0 degrees up, a small mountain or hill about 10-20 miles away would be about 6-10 degrees up, and looking straight up would be 90 degrees.

 When checking into the Net, please use your callsign and location. If you’d like to be an official reporting station on the Net and you are in the path of totality, please email Marc Peterson, W7PM at w7pm@live.com asking to be added to the Official reporting station list.

 Net Control and Travelers Assistant Help  

Callsign       Name            NC Type                    Individual or Team

W7PAT            Pat Roberson              Net Control for Actual Event              ARRG

KC7NYR           Mark Pierce                 Monitor/Traveler’s Assist                  ARRG

W0KCF            Kevin   Fox                  Monitor/Traveler’s Assist                  ARRG

W0DSF            Debbie Fox                  Monitor/Traveler’s Assist                  ARRG

W7PM             Marc Peterson            Net Control/Monitor/Helper             ARRG

K7RPT              ARRG Team                 Net Control/Monitor/Helper             ARRG

Official Observing Station List (in order of totality) 

Location     Name        Call            Individual or Team 

Rickerall                       Stuart Fox                     K6MQA             Individual

West Salem                 Pat Roberson              W7PAT             ARRG                   

Salem – Riverfront      Damon Talbot             KC7NEC           Individual  

Salem OMSI/NASA      Marc Peterson             K7RPT              ARRG

                                    Tony Hair                    K7RPT              ARRG

                                    Will Lucas                    K7RPT              ARRG

Silver Falls State Park  Matt Mohlman           AD7WR           Individual

Madras                       Josh Richesin              K7JLR               ARRG

                                    Shelly Richesin             K7SSR              ARRG

Madras Airport           Bill DeBuhr                  K7GPN             Individual

Prineville                     Lynn Burrell                KE7WKM          Individual

  

 

 

Portland Mini Maker Faire at OMSI




General Info about the Faire 

The Portland Mini Maker Faire at OMSI showcases the amazing works of all kinds and ages of makers—anyone who is embracing the do-it-yourself (or do-it-together) spirit and wants to share their accomplishments with an appreciative audience. 

The sheer variety of the more than 100 exhibits, most of them hands-on, will boggle the mind. The Portland Mini Maker Faire will run the gamut from demonstrations of 3D printing and robot welding, to knife forging, bee keeping, recycled skateboard jewelry, and much more!

Younger Licensed Hams Needed

 If you are licensed and a teen and can help volunteer at the Ham Radio Exhibit – we really need you! We are particularly interested in getting a couple younger Hams involved to be our youth ambassadors during the two-day event..

Every year there are about 1000 younger people that stop by our booth, but they are greeted by old hams, that scare off most of the kids from becoming interested.

Display and Table Help Needed for 2017

We are currently seeking other groups or individuals who would like to build a interactive Amateur Radio display covering your favorite Ham Radio topic. We still have several open 8' tables (displays) available. ARRG will be setting up two HF and VHF/UHF radio stations with two operator positions to assist those that wish to get on the air..

 

Some of the areas we feel are important to be included this year are tables of displays that teach people about Emergency Preparedness, Info about ARES and CERT. Even more important is to educate the over7500 Faire participants about Ham Radio and how to get licensed and to discuss technical topics like APRS, MESH or of show other DIGITAL formats live and in action. Basically, any topic that uses Ham Radio and that you would think could be both exciting and educational.

 

Groups or Individuals who are assigned to the ARRG sponsored space will not have to pay OMSI for booth space, rental tables or the Tent awning normally required.

 

 

September 16, 17, 2017 09:30- 5:30

OMSI MINI MAKER FAIRE

 ARRG is once again hosting the annual 'Amateur Radio Exhibit’ which is held in the north parking lot of OMSI every year.

We are located in Bldg. C, which is located on the west side of the main event.

We are excited to report that we have several Amateur Radio Groups and even a couple Individuals who are joining the Exhibit and showing their Ham Wares and DIY efforts.

We do this because we are trying to reach out and teach the public about Amateur Radio.

We also like to try and get as many Maker Faire participants on the air as we can during the two-day event.

For 2017, the ARRG team will be enhancing the very popular Morse Code Lab, we put on last year.

Kids and Parents alike really enjoyed the lab, hands on Morse Code terminals, for both trying to transmit and then receive Morse Code.

This year, we are also happy to announce that the Cascade Council BSA Radio Scouting Team will be displaying and assisting in our space.

We also have Beaverton CERT, who builds a wonderful and informative display of 72 Hr. Kits and showing their Radio Go Kits.

 

Please contact Marc Peterson, W7PM at w7pm@live.com if you are interested in helping design and setup a table display.

 
Marc Douglas, AE7KK Net Control
Marc Douglas AE7KK working Net Control
2016 Cycle for Life Ride
Pre Race Safety Team Meeting
July 15, 2017, 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.  
Annual Cystic Fibrosis Cycle for Life Ride

For the forth year in a row, dozens of ARRG members and other area Amateur Radio volunteers will come together to form the CFL Radio Safety Team.

The team is made up of between 14 to 20 Amateur Radio Volunteers, who have trained for this annual event. Our team is responsible for setting up two Net Control (dispatch) radio positions and provide the trained operators to effectively operate each station.

 

The team also provides two radio operators at the four rest stops along the 35, 65 and 100 mile long bike routes.

Our team also provides 3 or Support and Gear Support and Gear  (SAG) vehicles, provided by the Amateur Radio Operators who have SAG experience.

 

The 2017 CFL Ride Net Control setup and race start/finish line is located at the Oak Knoll Winery in Hillsboro.

 

Special thanks to Pat Roberson, W7PAT and Jenny Roberson, KA7JNY, who have been our Net Control operators for our forth year in a row!

 

The event is already full, but if you would like to volunteer for the 2018 CFL Ride, please contact us here.